Sermons (Page 34)

January 23, 2010: Fishing With Jesus

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Third Sunday after the Epiphany

Jesus returns from the wilderness of temptation. John’s in jail now, so his traveling revival’s shut down. Today Jesus goes fishing. He nets two ordinary people, fishermen in fact. “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” That must have been a great line. Simon and Andrew immediately drop their nets and livelihood to follow. Jesus spots two more brothers, James and John, mending nets in a boat with their dad. Jesus calls them – and suddenly the old man sits alone in his boat wondering what just happened. Three becomes five. They follow and watch as Jesus preaches and teaches the good news of God, healing people and curing diseases – signs something new is a foot.

January 16, 2010: Finding Jesus

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Second Sunday after the Epiphany

My first Church History professor began each class with an excerpt from a book, Bible in Pocket, Gun in Hand, true stories of frontier religion. Very few people on the frontier knew much about the Biblical story, including the players, places and even Jesus. One day while wandering the backwoods, a preacher thought he heard a fellow Methodist singing a hymn, only to discover as he came closer the man was singing a profane song. As the custom of frontier ministers, Rev. Freeborn Garrettson asked him about his religious convictions. “Do you know Jesus Christ?” “Sir, I do not know where the gentleman lives.” Thinking the fellow had misunderstood, the reverend tries again. “Sir,” the man innocently replied, “I do not know him. He must not live in these parts.”

January 2, 2010: You are a Star

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Second Sunday after Christmas Day

Well before the time Jesus is born, in a land way to the east of the Jews, a group called magi, wise men, gather to pray, read ancient writings, and scan the night skies. Their tribe, for generations, believed the Lord of Majesty would send a star to announce a child-king’s birth. That king will bring The Lord’s salvation for all people.

One night the magi notice a bright object. The light grows more intense and comes closer. Without speaking a word they each know. The time has come. The Lord is giving the sign – a star that comes for them. So they gather gifts for the child others long ago set aside, pack, say goodbyes, and depart to wherever the star leads them.

December 19, 2010: Annunciation – God is With Us

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Fourth Sunday of Advent

Close your eyes. I warn you, don’t fall asleep! Imagine you’re walking into the church for the children’s Christmas Pageant. You hear this year’s pageant will be different. “How dare they change anything,” you think, “Jesus just better be born in King James English tonight.” After the opening carol, a teenager comes out and announces: “Now the birth of Jesus the Messiah took place in this way.” No – that’s wrong. It begins: “And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.” Everybody knows that.

November 14, 2010: Life in an Interval

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Twenty-Fifth Sunday after Pentecost

A committee member at our final interview with a candidate for Holy Orders asks, “Who is Jesus for you?” The response went something like: “Jesus is my friend. I talk with him often. He listens, gives me peace and comforts me. Jesus is my helper.” Well, that’s sweet. So I jumped in and asked, “Does Jesus ever annoy you? Does he ever get under your skin, disturb or bother you at all?” The person looked a little stunned and stumbled over an answer: “Well, yeah, I guess he could be that way.” “Good, I was afraid I ticked Jesus off. Sometimes he just annoys the dickens out of me.”

November 7, 2010: Hope That Lies Before Us

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

She put me on the spot. She holds up others behind her to ask, “Will I still be married to Bob in heaven?” Her husband had died recently – no children, no family near-by. She grieves, feels alone and misses him. What do I say? This is not the time or place. I know what Jesus says. She wouldn’t like how Jesus answers some Sadducees who ask him a resurrection question. They don’t even believe in a resurrection.

Evensong October 31, 2010: All Faithful Departed

Homily
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost

Today is the eve of All Saints’ Day, also called, All Hallows Eve – which morphs into Halloween. An infestation of witches, vampires, avatars and only God knows what else landed in our neighborhood last evening – demanding candy to keep us from being harmed. One creature looked like a combination of zombie and Satan. So, I asked, “And who are you?” A voice responded, “I am a candidate for the U.S. Senate.” I gave him all my candy, begged him to leave me alone, ran into the house, and locked the door. I was terrified.

October 31, 2010: Do You Really Want to Meet Jesus?

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost

Many a child came home from Bible School singing a song about Zacchaeus. You may forget your cell phone number, but you’ll always remember, Zacchaeus was a wee little man; a wee little man was he.” This past week I watched on You Tube as someone’s dancing darling performed to the song. She shakes, looks up at an imaginary Zacchaeus, wags her finger, and demands he come down now, over and over. I’m sure her parents are thrilled. I think it could be awhile before Dancing with the Stars comes looking for her.

October 17, 2010: Persistence That Pays Off

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost

The one who persists prevails. The squeaky wheel gets the grease – yeah, we know all that. We’ve seen it. Have you ever watched a dad push a grocery cart into a check-out line? Seated in the carrier is his little princess. As soon as she spots the candy rack to her right, and dad turns to unload the cart, little sweetie morphs into a devil in diapers – pointing and shrieking loudly. People turn and stare. If she just wails long and loud, she’s learned she can get a candy bar. “Here – now be quiet,” red-faced dad pleads, as he nods and smiles to a staring audience.

August 8, 2010: Keep at It

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Initially Jesus’ words might bring some comfort – “Don’t have fear, little flock.” Not fear – you’re asleep if you don’t have fear. We have a rising national debt, unemployment, house foreclosures. Retirements and pensions circle the drain, not to mention terrorists, wars and oil spills. “Don’t fear. God’s good pleasure is to give us the kingdom.” Great – who turns down a free gift? But can we trust it even exists?