Sermons (Page 33)

September 18, 2011: How Fair Do We Want God to Be?

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

After the service, a parishioner offered his unsolicited feedback to my sermon: “What do you know about running a business anyway? Paying workers that way is not fair. Just stick to religion and preaching, but not preaching about business.” He’s right. Pay a person a full-day wage for an hour of work, and you’ll be out of business in no time. Next time the unemployed see you drive the bus up, guess how many pass and wait for the day’s last bus? The problem with Jesus’ story – It’s not fair. You don’t reward people who don’t pull their own load.

September 11, 2011: Forgiveness Leads to Reconciliation

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The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Ever tried to swim in opposite directions at the same time? Looks like most are smart enough not to try that. Many churches will make an attempt today. One direction is celebration. We celebrate the return from summer, the church program year beginning, and the onset of fall. The opposite direction is less than joyful – somber and reflective. We hold in our souls events of this day ten years ago. Do you remember where you were when you heard the news – then came numbness, shock, a surreal feeling? We soon realized our world is forever changed.

August 28, 2001: Peter’s Resistance Movement

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Crowds rush Jesus wanting to make him their king. Jesus runs the other direction to escape them. Peter agrees with the crowd, and says Jesus is King in waiting, the Messiah. For saying Jesus and Messiah in the same breath, Peter wins a new name – Rock, and Jesus hands him a set of keys for the new kingdom.

August 21, 2011: Right Confession – What’s It Mean?

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Late one afternoon my favorite Rabbi rang me up: “Get over here now.” “Why, what’s up?” John tells me a large Christian body has just voted and declared open season on Jews. “What do you mean?” He said, “They want to convert us to your side. A TV news reporter is on the way to interview me. You’ve got to come and say not all Christians are like this.” So, I went to the synagogue. I told the reporter, “Not all Christians believe Jesus sends us to tell Jews or anyone to ‘turn or burn.’ Jesus sends us to love others and reconcile people, not divide and conquer with fear and guilt.” At least that seemed to be the spirit of the Jesus I had come to know.

August 14, 2011: Chance or Providence?

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The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Two different worlds are about to collide. In Jacob’s word, a famine bears down on the land. He hears Egypt has storehouses aplenty and loaded with food; plus no national debt, and AAA+ rated Egyptian treasury notes. Since their economy booms, Jacob sends his sons for help. Keep in mind this is not a run to the corner grocery store for milk and eggs. It’s long and treacherous journey. They’ll need more than food for a week – food for children, children’s children, flocks and servants.

July 31, 2011: Nighttime Rumble

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

Two wives, two handmaids – eleven kids, a stout “stock” portfolio (this stock is sheep not shares), twenty years later Jacob packs up to go home. Like a thief in the night, he slips out taking all he has acquired and a little more.  Uncle Laban goes looking for Jacob, intending to kill him. But one night on the trail, the Lord drops in through a dream and tells Laban, “You’d better not touch a hair on Jacob’s head.” So, when Laban catches him, instead of killing Jacob, Laban whines: “I can’t believe you would leave without kisses and good-byes, or let me throw a farewell party, and YOU STOLE MY GODS! I want them back.” After Laban searches and cannot find his missing idols with Jacob’s tribe – don’t you hate it when you lose your gods – (Rachel secretly stole and packed them in her saddle) they all kiss, say goodbye, and make a covenant not to harm each other.

July 24, 2011: Laban’s Newlywed Game

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Sixth Sunday after Pentecost

Remember last week – Jacob’s on the lam – running for his life from his brother who wants to kill him. He’s deceived his brother and his father. Now he’s running – to find a wife. Jacob retires after a long day, goes to sleep, and meets the Lord in a dream who tells him he’s given the Promise. The next morning he’s so excited he makes an outdoor chapel. Finally, He finally arrives in Haran, hometown for his mom, Rebekah – and his destination. What follows is a Yogi-ism: “It’s déjà vu all over again,” from whom we also have: “When you come to a fork in the road…take it.” That’s Yogi Berra, a poet, wise sage, and former major league baseball player.

July 17, 2011: Keeping and Scattering the Promise

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Last week Isaac and Rebekah are newlyweds. Twenty years later, today, they are childless. Isaac keeps hoping. They keep trying, until the day he applies for Medicare only to find pediatrics is not covered. When our options have been exhausted – we’ve tried everything, what then do we do? We pray. “Lord, the clock’s ticking. We still have no child,” Before he ends the prayer, the narrator says Rebekah is with child. What’s been the problem? Was the Lord just waiting to be asked?

June 19, 2011: Trinity Sunday

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Trinity Sunday

You’d think with four priests, I wouldn’t have to preach Trinity Sunday five straight years. But I did. Trust me – explaining what the Trinity means is not as easy as it sounds. God in three persons; three in one, one in three – in a world where for many God isn’t even one – it’s pretty interesting territory.

June 5, 2011: Arisen Again

Sermon
The Rev. Dr. C. Steven Teague, Rector
Seventh Sunday of Easter

“Alleluia. Christ is risen – again!” Did you know Jesus is twice risen? Easter and then forty days later his apostles watch him lift off and rise through the clouds to be with the Father in heaven, where ever that is. It’s called the Ascension. It rates little more than a yawn in the church. Try finding a Happy Ascension Day card at Hallmark to send a friend. It’s a tough story to explain in a world where about all that rises is the cost of gas and taxes.